Thursday, December 17, 2015

HORROR 101: THE WAY FORWARD - GREAT ADVICE FROM THE BEST IN THE BUSINESS!


http://www.amazon.com/Horror-101-Steve-Rasnic-Tem-ebook/dp/B00JZJQUYW/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1450384443&sr=1-2&keywords=horror+101

Horror 101: The Way Forward is a great tome written by many authors who share their wealth of advice with you. Yes, this was set up to be advice for those wishing to write in the horror genre, but any author will grab valuable advice from within its pages. Joe Mynhardt and Crystal Lake Publishing are to be commended for compiling this super collection.

I am proud to have two articles in this 2015 Bram Stoker Award nominated book, and that I get to be included with so many of the top authors in the world.

The Kindle book is still only .99, and it is also available in paperback. This makes it especially attractive at this time of the year. Many of you would love to give this book as a gift to an author friend and pick up a copy for yourself if you don't have one already.

Happy Holidays!

Blaze McRob

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Book description:


 Horror 101 is a 2015 Bram Stoker Award nominee

Ever wanted to be a writer? Make money online? Make a name for yourself writing online? Perhaps you’ve already realized that dream and you’re looking to expand your repertoire. Writing comic books sounds nice, right? Or how about screenplays?

Horror 101, although written by horror authors, is a must read for any person interested in becoming a writer, be it writing for a hobby or a career. Or maybe you just want to see what goes on behind the scenes in a writer's life.

Then this non-fiction best seller, Bram Stoker Award nominee, is the book for you.

Horror 101: The Way Forward – a comprehensive overview of the Horror fiction genre and career opportunities available to established and aspiring authors.

Horror 101 is not your average On Writing guide. Horror 101 focuses on the career of an author. It covers not only insights into the horror genre, but the people who successfully make a living from it.

Covering aspects such as movies, comics, short stories, ghost-writing, audiobooks, editing, publishing, self-publishing, blogging, writer’s block, YA horror, reviewing, dark poetry, networking, collaborations, eBooks, podcasts, conventions, series, formatting, web serials, artwork, social media, agents, and career advice from seasoned professionals and up-and-coming talents, Horror 101 is just what you need to kick your career into high gear.

Horror 101: The Way Forward is perfect for people who:
• are suffering from writer’s block
• are starting their writing careers
• are planning on infiltrating a different field in horror writing
• are looking to pay more bills with their art
• are trying to establish a name brand
• are looking to get published
• are planning on self-publishing
• are looking for motivation and/or inspiration

And it’s only 99cent.

Here are just a few of the great articles and essays you can expect:
Making Contact by Jack Ketchum
What is Horror by Graham Masterton
Avoiding What’s Been Done to Death by Ramsey Campbell
Bitten by the Horror Bug by Edward Lee
Balancing Art and Commerce by Taylor Grant
From Prose to Scripts by Shane McKenzie
Writing About Films and for Film by Paul Kane
Screamplays! Writing the Horror Film by Lisa Morton
Screenplay Writing: The First Cut Is the Deepest by Dean M. Drinkel
Publishing by Simon Marshall-Jones
Weighing Up Traditional Publishing & eBook Publishing by Robert W. Walker
Audiobooks: Your Words to Their Ears by Chet Williamson
Ghost-writing: You Can’t Write It If You Can’t Hear It by Thomas Smith
What a Short Story Editor Does by Ellen Datlow
Self-Publishing: Making Your Own Dreams by Iain Rob Wright
Partners in the Fantastic: The Pros and Cons of Collaborations by Michael McCarty
A beginner’s guide to setting up and running a website by Michael Wilson
Poetry and Horror by Blaze McRob
Horror for Kids: Not Child’s Play by Francois Bloemhof
So you want to write comic books… by C.E.L. Welsh
Horror Comics – How to Write Gory Scripts for Gruesome Artists by Jasper Bark
Writing the Series by Armand Rosamilia
Running a Web serial by Tonia Brown
The 7 Signs that make Agents and Editors say, "Yes!" by Anonymous
Filthy Habits – Writing and Routine by Jasper Bark
Do You Need an Agent? by Eric S Brown
Ten Short Story Endings to Avoid by William Meikle
Editing and Proofreading by Diane Parkin
How to Dismember Your Darlings – Editing Your Own Work by Jasper Bark
From Reader to Writer: Finding Inspiration by Emma Audsley
Writing Exercises by Ben Eads
The Year After Publication… by Rena Mason
Writing Horror: 12 Tips on Making a Career of It by Steve Rasnic Tem
Networking at Conventions by Lucy A. Snyder
Pitch to Impress: How to Stand Out from the Convention Crowd by RJ Cavender
You Better (Net)Work by Tim Waggoner 

By Bacchus on May 1, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The world of publishing is more than a little bewildering these days, with new options for publishing and a greater need than ever for writers to know how to market their work and promote themselves. Although this book is a mixed bag, the info that is helpful in this volume far outweighs the fluff, and is worth much more than the price of the book. If you're just starting out as a writer you NEED to read this book. If you're a pro with sales under your belt or are self-publishing your work, you'll find resources in here to increase your sales and fan base. There's great practical advice on the act of writing, being a writer (acting professionally), how and where to promote yourself, etc. from writers of books and movies, from veterans and fairly new success stories, from reviewers and editors. No matter what level you're on as a writer, you'll learn something worth learning.
  By Cory Cline on June 25, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
As another wannabe horror writer who always appreciates advice from the pros, Crystal Lake Publishing's Horror 101:The Way Forward was hard to resist. Joe Mynhardt has collected a slew of invaluable advice from some of the biggest names in horror as well as some of the new blood that is surely on their way to becoming well respected horror authors.

I am old enough to be of the classic On Writing Horror school, so much of the advice in here is simply hammered home again, but with updated views and fresh voices. Jack Ketchum, Graham Masterson, and Edward Lee begin the parade of great advice with their own beliefs on the horror genre. Ramsey Campbell gives some great advice on avoiding whats been done before, Steve Rasnic Tem gives a dozen solid tips on making a career, and Rocky Wood invites us to the Horror Writers Association. These well respected, and well known authors give solid advice that is fresh to hear again in their respective voices.

Writing has changed so much since the above mentioned classic that there needed to be something new to answer questions by writers, like me, who are realizing how vital the digital age is to a successful writing career. I am one of those writers who has no problem getting through a draft or two, but I get to the editing part and... oh look a butterfly is dancing around the garden outside my window... I can address my problems as a writer, but I am still fairly new to Facebook and the digital age. After years of telling myself how ridiculous Facebook and Twitter is, I have come to realize how vital it can be if used correctly. Many of the newer authors in this book have been active in the digital age for some time and I have picked up vital advice from authors I was somewhat familiar with, like Shane McKenzie, Michael Arnzen, Lucy Snyder,Tim Waggoner, and Scott Nicholson.

I was also more than pleasantly surprised by the advice from authors like Jasper Bark, Weston Ochse, Blaze McRob, and a few others whose writing was so good for this anthology of advice, that I will surely be looking forward to reading more from them and have already added many of them to my mental list of authors to check out.

As a struggling wannabe writer, I have to applaud and thank Joe Mynhardt, not only for his great advice within the pages of his anthology, but for taking the time to put this book together. The time he must have spent talking to these authors, putting it all together, and editing it must have been exhausting and I'm sure he cussed himself out for beginning such a detailed and extensive project. At the end, he has created a classic that any writer, not just us horror junkies, can call upon for advice and inspiration.

Thanks Joe!


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