Monday, November 17, 2014

THE MISSING YEAR - BY BELINDA FRISCH - A MUST READ!






http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00OBWB1U6



The Missing Year, by Belinda Frisch, is a must read! Belinda is my favorite Zombie author, but now she comes to us with a new blend of genres: real life horror, romance, mystery, and her display of knowledge in the medical field. Anything Belinda writes is great. Snatch this up! You will love it.


Blaze McRob



Book Description

November 6, 2014
Thirty-four-year-old Blake Wheeler was everything Lila had ever wanted. A rising-star surgeon with his whole life ahead of him, Blake gave Lila ten perfect years of marriage before plunging her into the hardest year of their lives.

When a late night shooting leaves Blake in a coma, Lila is faced with a difficult decision: continue life support or let him go.

One year later, Lila remains unwilling to speak, in a private mental health facility where she refuses to move on.

Dr. Ross Reeves knows firsthand about loss, having spent the better part of five years burying himself in his work. Tasked with the challenge of breaking Lila's silence, Ross investigates Lila's past and her husband's death, finding more to Blake's murder than meets the eye. A series of mysterious coincidences has Ross wondering if Lila is acting out of grief ... or guilt.
 
 

Editorial Reviews

From the Author

Life. Death. A Choice.
  
Two lives converge when a psychiatrist who has lost the love of his life to terminal cancer meets the most difficult patient he'll ever treat: Lila Wheeler. Lila, an inpatient in an upstate New York psychiatric facility, has spent over a year pining for the loss of her husband, Blake, who was left on life support following a botched convenience store robbery. To tell you much more would give away the crux of the conflict, but The Missing Year deals with the choices we make for ourselves and our loved ones and how in the face of terminal suffering, those choices sometimes lead to rash decisions. 

About the Author

*Runner-up Halloween Book Festival 2012 and optioned for film, Cure
*Honorable Mention New York Book Festival 2014, Better Left Buried
*Amazon Top 100 Medical Thriller, Fatal Reaction

After fifteen years of working in healthcare, Belinda Frisch's stories can't help being medicine influenced. A writer of dark tales in the horror, mystery, and thriller genres, Belinda tells the stories she'd like to read. Her fiction has appeared in Shroud Magazine, Dabblestone Horror, and Tales of the Zombie War. She is the author of Cure, Afterbirth, Fatal Reaction, Better Left Buried, and The Missing Year. She resides in upstate New York with her husband and a small menagerie of beloved animals.

Visit her blog at: BelindaF.blogspot.com 
 
 
5.0 out of 5 stars grab tissues November 16, 2014
Format:Kindle Edition
Omg get the tissues. I was given this book for an honest review and just let me say I can only imagine if I had to make decisions for the love of my life to live or die. Lila is just strong even when she thinks she weak. Dr Ross is sexy but broken as well Together these two help heal each others wounds without even knowing it. what a great book. 
 
 
 
 
4.0 out of 5 stars Physician, heal thyself November 14, 2014
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Four stars for this story of love, loss, and picking up the pieces.

Dr. Ross Reeves left New York to live with the love of his life, Sarah. Now, five years after having lost her to cancer, he’s a shell of a man trapped in the past. His home is a living museum to his late wife, his relationship with his girlfriend Mattie suffers, and his only solace is work. But even the distraction of work fails him when his ‘do whatever it does to get the job done’ tactics affects the welfare of a patient and gets him in hot water. Things look glum, until he receives a call from a colleague in New York seeking his help with Lila Wheeler, a psychiatric patient who hasn’t spoken a word in a year. Going back to the place where he and Sarah met and risking drudging up painful memories of a life together cut short is not high on Ross’s list of priorities, until he learns that Lila has lost her husband under tragic circumstances. The similarities between Lila and himself are too intriguing to pass up, and Ross agrees to help out. During the course of Ross’s treatment of Lila, he’ll discover clues leading to the true nature of the tragedy Lila lived through, and find that while he’s the doctor, she is as likely to aid him in the healing process as he is her.

My readings tastes are eclectic, so when I saw that Belinda Frisch was working on a contemporary romance/women’s fiction novel I was intrigued. I’ve read good amounts in both categories, and while they’re not my mainstay genres, I’ve enjoyed them. A good story is a good story, and The Missing Year is a good story. Is it contemporary romance? To a point, yes. Is it women’s fiction? In its way. It is more than that? Yes. The novel is a blend of those elements with the medical theme that the author is known for thrown in for good measure.

As with Frisch’s other novels, The Missing Year is told in her fast, pages-turning style that never sacrifices detail and characterization. The players are well drawn (my favorite being Ross’s colorful friend from his early days with Sarah, Camille, who steals every scene she’s in), the dialogue pops, and the plot has plenty of twists and turns. Meticulously researched, the medical jargon is always clearly explained but never dumbed down, and it doesn’t take away from the heart of the book: the characters and the decisions they make. Oftentimes, novels that deal with anything medical can get a little too clinical, resulting in a dry read. That’s not the case with The Missing Year. Despite the author’s clear, concise, no-fat style, this book breaths through its characters and mergers several genres into one enjoyable book.

Those reading this author for the first time will find a lot to like about the book. For fans of Frisch’s previous work, The Missing Year is like putting on a favorite pair of jeans and discovering some money tucked away in the pocket. It’s comfortable and familiar, but is pleasantly unexpected.
 

 

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