Thursday, April 17, 2014

AUTUMN CHRISTIAN - WOMAN IN HORROR!






https://www.facebook.com/autumn.christian.7?fref=ts


http://www.autumnchristian.net/


https://www.facebook.com/pages/Autumn-Christian/112675265428516






Autumn Christian is my Woman In Horror today! Autumn's writing is anything but conventional. That is superb, because she is such a fresh voice. A snippet from her website http://www.autumnchristian.net/
Quiet little rebellion: women in horror:

"Nobody owns your writing but you. As women we’re taught to be caring, kind and think of our own feelings as secondary. We’re rarely allowed moments of peace, moments to think only of ourselves. And despite how we think we’ve escaped the 1950s idea of the woman as servant, it’s still imbued in us and imbued in our culture. It’s why anorexia is seen as a woman’s disease, because we feel quiet, restrained, as if we have no power. And a way to gain back that power is to impress it upon our own bodies. Writing is the same sort of power. In that moment of writing, you are untouchable."

With her super writing skills, love for the craft, and an attitude that says "fuck you, I'll do it my way," Autumn is an unstoppable force. I am patiently waiting for more of her great books to arrive. If you are looking for fluff books, Christian is not your author. If, like me, you enjoy a powerful pull on your imagination, a tale grabbing you with all its might, tossing you into your chair and saying, "Read me; tremble, and think."Voila! You are home, baby! Autumn is a thinking reader's author, while at the same time giving you one hell of a ride into adventures you never knew existed. Below is a superb review of her book We Are Wormwood.
5.0 out of 5 stars I Am Wormwood October 7, 2013
By Jeremy
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Surreal Grotesque loyalists will no doubt remember the interview I conducted with the elegant enigma that is Autumn Christian in the June issue. There, she demonstrated a fierce intelligence and an eagerness to explore thematic topics both in her own work and the world at large. This long awaited (on my part) follow up to 2010's The Crooked God Machine finds her delving even deeper into the stark realm of human fragility, which is really a testament to her talent considering that on her first sojourn, she took us on a shuttle to Hell and into a soggy swampland abyss inhabited by the bones of dead children.

Yes, the only author I feel qualified to proclaim `Stranger than Bizarro' is back with a haunting masterpiece which, at its heart, is about relationships, how much trust and faith we are willing to put into another being, and how seldom those gifts are reciprocated. It begins with young Lily living in a house filled with spiders, pillbugs and beetles. It is the Year of Poison. She lives with her mother, who carries a gazelle skull and votive candles around, weaving stories so wonderful that even Lily's school invites her as a guest speaker on occasion. But Lily's mother is not well. She sometimes shows her other face, The Exorcist, with eyes scratched like lightning. The Exorcist is necessary, as she tells Lily, to protect them from the Nightcatcher. So We Are Wormwood begins.

There is a haunting use of language, a verbosity that pulsates right off the page and into your imagination. Some examples:

"We will always kill dragons together."

`There'd been the gardener with the cracked-chasm lips, whispering "drugs" in my ear like a love story.'

"He held the back of my neck like a mother wolf as I bent and snorted cocaine from a piece of broken mirror."

"But it was not God like you would imagine him, some kindly bearded old man with big bare feet sitting on a white throne next to white Jesus. This was a god of Technicolor vomit, noise, hissing spit, and fluttering wings. And when I asked him the meaning of life, he could do nothing but screech."

And my personal favorite: "I used to talk to God," Cignus said. "I thought he could hear me."

Nowhere else will you find characters such as Saint Peter, Arachne and a demon painted so plausibly and endearingly. Autumn Christian's worlds come alive with lush and vibrant metaphors and a striking attention to language. She rarely uses the same word twice. Her characters are all tragic figures, forced to act out their parts on the stage of a nihilistic passion play, and the audience already knows how it ends. They remain to see how they get there. There is no one else who can do what Autumn does. 
 
I guess this says it all, doesn't it? There should be no doubt in anyone's mind that Autumn Christian is a Woman In Horror!
 
 
Blaze McRob 




About

Autumn Christian is a fiction writer and game designer. Find her website at www.autumnchristian.net
Biography
Autumn Christian is a fiction writer and game designer. Like Kafka, she considers writing a curse. Unlike Kafka, she does not hire prostitutes. She's been published in obscure literary magazines, screamed poetry about fucking Bukowski on stage at dive bars, and has been kicked out of pitch sessions by agents from Tor. The Crooked God Machine is her first novel.


The Crooked God Machine on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/The-Crooked-God-Machine-ebook/dp/B006PNJ2L4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1326439735&sr=8-1
A Gentle Hell on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=a+gentle+hell&x=0&y=0

Twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/autumnxtian
Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5409576.Autumn_Christian





Autumn Christian is a fiction writer who lives in the dark woods with poisonous blue flowers in her backyard and a black deer skull on her wall. She is waiting for the day when she hits her head on the cabinet searching for the popcorn bowl and all consensus reality dissolves.
She's been a freelance writer, a game designer, a cheese producer, a haunted house actor, and a video game tester. She considers Philip K. Dick, Ray Bradbury, Katie Jane Garside, the southern gothic, and dubstep, as main sources of inspiration.




We are Wormwood by Christian, Autumn (Jul 29, 2013)

Book Description

July 29, 2013
Ever since she was a child, Lily has been pursued by a demonic girl with wormwood eyes.

As Lily struggles with her schizophrenic mother’s decline into insanity, the death of her somnambulist childhood love, and her own painful, disturbed adolescence, she must face the strange girl that haunts her.

Yet something is chasing her that is much more dangerous.

A darkly surreal, drug-coated romance, We are Wormwood tells an inhuman love story, and the transformation that results from affection among monsters.

Editorial Reviews

Review


"This is truly a work of art. There are lines of dialogue in We are Wormwood so elegant as to be like literary silk. Autumn Christian is the Dutchess of the Darkside!" - Jeremy Maddux, editor of "Surreal Grotesque Magazine" and author of "Open Lines"

"
If you want lush and beautifully crafted prose, a story that will challenge what you think you know or believe, a story that might even make you a little ill (but never in a gratuitous way), then you might just have found your new favourite author." - Tracie Mcbride, Editor at Dark Continents 

"Take her hand, and let her pull you under." - Adam J. Nicolai, author of "Alex" and "Rebecca"

"Christian has one of the most interesting and haunting voices I've ever had the pleasure to read. Her peyote-trip imagery and unapologetic confrontations with all manner of unseemly human behavior return in this dark portrait of a girl whose schizophrenic mother has foretold for her a great and terrible destiny."  - SLUG Magazine
5.0 out of 5 stars I Am Wormwood October 7, 2013
By Jeremy
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Surreal Grotesque loyalists will no doubt remember the interview I conducted with the elegant enigma that is Autumn Christian in the June issue. There, she demonstrated a fierce intelligence and an eagerness to explore thematic topics both in her own work and the world at large. This long awaited (on my part) follow up to 2010's The Crooked God Machine finds her delving even deeper into the stark realm of human fragility, which is really a testament to her talent considering that on her first sojourn, she took us on a shuttle to Hell and into a soggy swampland abyss inhabited by the bones of dead children.

Yes, the only author I feel qualified to proclaim `Stranger than Bizarro' is back with a haunting masterpiece which, at its heart, is about relationships, how much trust and faith we are willing to put into another being, and how seldom those gifts are reciprocated. It begins with young Lily living in a house filled with spiders, pillbugs and beetles. It is the Year of Poison. She lives with her mother, who carries a gazelle skull and votive candles around, weaving stories so wonderful that even Lily's school invites her as a guest speaker on occasion. But Lily's mother is not well. She sometimes shows her other face, The Exorcist, with eyes scratched like lightning. The Exorcist is necessary, as she tells Lily, to protect them from the Nightcatcher. So We Are Wormwood begins.

There is a haunting use of language, a verbosity that pulsates right off the page and into your imagination. Some examples:

"We will always kill dragons together."

`There'd been the gardener with the cracked-chasm lips, whispering "drugs" in my ear like a love story.'

"He held the back of my neck like a mother wolf as I bent and snorted cocaine from a piece of broken mirror."

"But it was not God like you would imagine him, some kindly bearded old man with big bare feet sitting on a white throne next to white Jesus. This was a god of Technicolor vomit, noise, hissing spit, and fluttering wings. And when I asked him the meaning of life, he could do nothing but screech."

And my personal favorite: "I used to talk to God," Cignus said. "I thought he could hear me."

Nowhere else will you find characters such as Saint Peter, Arachne and a demon painted so plausibly and endearingly. Autumn Christian's worlds come alive with lush and vibrant metaphors and a striking attention to language. She rarely uses the same word twice. Her characters are all tragic figures, forced to act out their parts on the stage of a nihilistic passion play, and the audience already knows how it ends. They remain to see how they get there. There is no one else who can do what Autumn does. 
(6)

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The Crooked God Machine by Christian, Autumn (Dec 23, 2011)

Book Description

December 23, 2011
The Black Planet is an oppressive world terrorized by a masked god. Charles is a young idealist who lives in constant fear of being taken from his family for his heretical ideas. When Charles meets an enigmatic and scarred woman named Leda, she gives him hope for an existence outside of the god's regime. When Leda disappears, Charles leaves his small town to search for her. Along the way he will uncover the truth of the origins of the Black Planet, and confront the god that would destroy all life in the pursuit of a perfect and unchanging paradise. 
The Crooked God Machine is a dystopian horror about a broken family and a broken world. Compared to the work of David Lynch, H.R Giger, and Philip K. Dick, it's at once darkly romantic, violent, and uncomfortably familiar.

Editorial Reviews

Review

"The writing is like the love child of Salvador Dali, David Lynch, and HR Giger. It's sinuous, cutting, insidious, unapologetic." - Adam Nicolai, author of Rebecca and Alex

"A tragic, endearing love story against a twisted backdrop that draws on the horrors of religious fanaticism, human complacency, and political corruption. At times it's terrifying, heartbreaking, sweet, wickedly funny, or any combination of the four" - Greg Sisco, author of The Blood Brothers Series and One Night Stan's

"....a strangely beautiful, dark tale that has the power to enchant the reader whilst it's twisted logic drills deep into the psyche." - Parrish Lantern

"If you can't untie your mind and let in some seriously surreal dystopian horror wander in, you may not enjoy it. I implore you, for the good of your soul, to try, because this book is fucking fantastic. This debut novel from Autumn Christian is full of a thick, ancient darkness; Christian has a voice and a worldview unlike any author I've ever read." - Megan Kennedy, SLUG Magazine

About the Author

Autumn Christian is a fiction writer who lives in the dark woods with poisonous blue flowers in  her backyard and a black deer skull on her wall. She is waiting for the day when she hits her head on the cabinet searching for the popcorn bowl and all consensus reality dissolves.

She's been a freelance writer, a game designer, a cheese producer, a haunted house actor, and a video game tester. She considers Philip K. Dick, Ray Bradbury, Katie Jane Garside, the southern gothic, and dubstep, as main sources of inspiration.
5.0 out of 5 stars Twisted, Dark and Beautiful March 31, 2012
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Thumbing through my reviews will show you that I give almost nothing a 5-star review so please take the time to see why I gave one to The Crooked God Machine.

This book is a must-read for fans of the genre. I don't actually read a lot of this kind of stuff because I think it's literary worth is often overshadowed by it's perversity and violence but this one, while containing a moderately high level of violence and unpleasant images, is full of heart and thick with substance. I read it through in two sittings, never wanting to put it down. If I didn't get such a late night start on it, I'd have easily read it entirely in a single sitting and as it was I had to force myself to put it down and go to bed.

The characters are likeable and while not fleshed out in the greatest detail I don't think it's a shortcoming. The author preserves for them an air of mystery and unapproachability that works well within the context of the story, never letting you feel like you can fully relate to their existence but still allowing you ample opportunity to bond with them enough to care about what happens to them.

So, anyhow, the setting of this story is apparently, since the characters do not know what "21st century earth english" is, far into the future or maybe in some sort of alternate reality. The only clues the reader is given is that most of the story takes place in a town called Edgewater on "The Black Planet". No state or country is named, unless I somehow missed it. The world is on the brink of apocalypse at the hands of an angry and seemingly cruel god although the reason for this god's anger and cruelty is not given nor is it, in my opinion, safe to assume that God is just evil for the sake of being evil so I guess it would be okay to assume that his motives are justified if that's more to your liking. I won't attempt to judge the author's motives behind her portayal of this god but there is a single reference to both a trinity and the 144,000 but the god of any specific religion is not expressed and a trinity is not inherent to just one religion. To me, this was done in good taste and is an effort appreciated by this reader, who has no religious affiliation but doesn't seek pleasure in bashing those that do.

Regarding the previous reviewer's reference to "savage religious extremism", I disagree with this analysis even though I suspect the reviewer has some affiliation with the author. I disagree because in this story there IS a god (of sorts, if nothing else) and God DOES control the world. So, whatever "savage religious extremism" exists, it exists on the part of the very real and very powerful "god" and the human extremists that exist in the story act at God's direction. Or so it seems, at least. Again, work it out how it best pleases you. There is room for you to do that in most places.

The story, and I don't want to spoil it in any way so I'm not going to go into anymore detail than this, almost disappointed me because it looked like it was going to deviate from it's present path onto... a different one. Thankfully, it did not and what I perceived to be a deviation turned out to be the framework for a conclusion that, immediately upon reaching, left me confused as to how I felt about the way the story ended. I think this is a good thing because the ending is complex and thought provoking. No, it isn't a mirror into our culture that makes you want to turn things on their head so that our world doesn't become their's. The provocation forces you to reflect on the characters - their trials and tribulations throughout the story. In the grander scheme of things, I suppose it wasn't a happy ending but on a personal level, with relation to how things could have turned out for the main characters, it was bittersweet but very warm.

It's a very well-written book as far as the author's efforts and talent are concerned. Plot holes and such are practically nonexistent and the ones that do exist are very minor points and their presence has no impact on the flow of the story. They are quickly forgotten because something is always happening to move the story along. Editing errors do exist but they are few in number and minor as well. At no point are you not able to read through them and continue unaffected.

In conclusion, I say that I think this book is definitely worth every grown person's time if they like this kind of stuff. It's not for kids. There's a couple of fairly graphic sex scenes and a couple of references to acts that, in the real world, would get anybody convicted of them put into a sex-offender registry but in no way is any of it pornographic.

Read the book. I can't imagine anybody not liking it. In fact, it's one of the best books I've ever read, in or out of the genre and I'm an avid reader.

And remember kids: The Yes/No buttons below are there for you to say whether this review gave you any helpful information before you made your purchase, NOT to voice your negative opinion of the book or as a statement of disagreement with some point I made. The comment box is where that stuff belongs and if you've already read this book then the Yes/No buttons are of no use to you anyway nor is my review of any use to you beyond it's entertainment value which can hardly be much. Please join me in my crusade to stop the misuse of the Yes/No buttons!! 
(16)

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A Gentle Hell by Christian, Autumn (Jan 1, 2012)

Book Description

January 1, 2012
A Gentle Hell is comprised of four dark speculative stories of quiet tension and uncomfortable nostalgia, written for deformed children and girls that dream of demons.

In “They Promised Dreamless Death” a salesmen sells sleep with the promise of a better life, but what dreams lurk beneath the substrate of consciousness for those who take it are stranger than they ever imagined.

In “Your Demiurge is Dead,” while the world adjusts to the death of God and the new reign of the Triple Goddess, Charles hunts for an Oklahoma murderer and is forced to confront his religious ideals when he encounters a new prophet.

“The Dog That Bit Her,” is the story of a neurotic young woman who gains freedom from her co-dependent marriage with the bite of a rabid dog.

And in the semi-autobiographical “The Singing Grass,” the artist and the writer converge at a meadow haunted by a carnivorous deer and the burnt monsters that show them the consequences of an artistic life.

5.0 out of 5 stars Thought provoking January 27, 2012
Format:Kindle Edition
Once again, the TALES OF DARKNESS AND DISMAY line up blows me away once again. Autumn Christian has the voice of one intelligent and colourful author. Some may argue that this isn't horror, as you'll be hard pushed to find splattered guts, cold blooded killers and monsters under the bed in this collection.

This is thought provoking stuff. Stories about relationships and the inner workings of character's heads make up these tales. The first story is particularly engaging mentally and nicely poignant, with the author avoiding so many, many clich├ęd endings she could have used.

Christian's horror comes in more like an after thought, as something that is just part of these characters' lives now and they just have to adapt to it. For example, there is a werewolf story in this collection, but the emphasis is not on the transformation, silver bullets and howling at the moon. Far from it. The flavour of the story is all about the relationship and the leading lady's mental state. You're riveted by this complicated and intriguing dynamic before the lycanthropy is even mentioned. With scenes like the girl coming through the window from a tree, barefoot and in a white dress in her sweet yet unsettling mental state...there's just so much poetry and beauty here.

Lovers of grue and big, sharp pointy things might turn their noses up, but I love all that stuff...and I loved this. She's the Pinhead of writing: articulate and restrained, but powerful. 
(14)

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