Sunday, April 29, 2012

SHORT STORY AND NOVEL PRICING AND MARKETING

http://www.markedwardhall.com/the-pros-of-publishing-short-stories-on-amazon



Mark Edward Hall is an author whose writing and marketing talents I respect very much. I first ran into his great novels when he was with his publisher. He is now a very vehement supporter of going it alone. Now before anyone shakes their heads and says, "Why is he foregoing the editing, cover art expertise, and formatting a publisher would provide for him, he is not. He pays for a great editor, wonderful cover art, and is well schooled in formatting arts. Thus he still puts out quality work. In fact, I owe him a great review for his last chilling tale Apocalypse Island.

I have the link above for his ebook marketing ideas but I will give you the nuts and bolts of it here. Mark prices short stories for.99 and bundled shorts and novels for $2.99. He keeps his availability open to include Amazon Kindle, Smashwords, and B&N. Of course, his novels are also available in paperback version.

One thing that intrigues me is the fact he supplies free short stories and has even published a novel on his blog. Fancy the concept. I  am publishing a novel on my blog at the present time, have done another one on my blog, and I have numerous poems, short stories, and flash fiction pieces there and other places as well. Just like Mark, I think this is the right thing to do. Are we giving it all away? Not really. Sure, our loyal readers will get to read for free, but they will tell others to come and visit. Not everyone enjoys reading stories on a computer screen and if they like an author's tales, they will purchase a well priced offering.

Check out Mark's blog, his Amazon page, Smashwords page, etc. and READ HIS GREAT BOOKS! Just saying. You will be glad you did.

Learn from people who are making a living doing what they enjoy doing the most!

Blaze

8 comments:

  1. Hi Mark, Hi Blaze-Great article that I am particularly interested in at the moment. I wrote a short to go with my debut novel. My publisher offered to publish it, but I thought that I'd just pay someone to do the cover art-and I did, maybe should have paid for an editor as well, but was only 10 pages or so. I signed up for Amazon's Kindle Direct which you supposedly get paid for even when your story is free. Just did this two weeks ago and will check back on FB to report my success or failure. Nice to hear from a former publisher that it is a smart thing to do-often wonder. Thanks for the wave of self confidence! Hope it lasts! Dina Rae

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  2. You'll do just fine in this wacky business of ours, Dina. The most important thing is writing a great story, and you already have that part down.

    Blaze

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  3. I'll have to check out Mark's post as well, but I've seen this idea batted around, and I like it. Well, mostly. I think it depends on your ultimate intentions with your work. I think it's important that authors are aware of the restrictions they are imposing on themselves when they post something to their blog.

    As an example, I wanted to submit my short story The Golden Parachute to the Horror For Good anthology, but since they were going for a Stoker, they were looking for primarily previously unpublished material. Even though I had added 3500 words (more than doubling the original story) that had never been published, because the main gist of the story was up at my blog, they wouldn't accept it. This was a big surprise to me and has made me leery of putting up much new material until I know that I'm not going to try and submit it anywhere.

    But I really like the pricing model. I've said it before (and probably here), but I think authors need to stop fighting over .99 scraps for their novels. An occasional sale? Sure. But if the market (and the quality of the novel) will bear the 2.99, I say we hold to our guns.

    Paul D. Dail
    www.pauldail.com- A horror writer's not necessarily horrific blog

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  4. I agree, Paul, that when we post things on our blogs we are ruling out certain options that might be available to us down the line. Of course, if we choose not to take advantage of some of these things, it doesn't really matter. For example: my online novel would knock the story out of contention for legacy publishing, but I don't care, since to me, that means nothing anyway. Been there, done that, don't want to do it again. But that's another whole big issue. I view my free offerings on my blog as another way for readers to find out if they like the style that belongs to Blaze. In a manner of speaking, it's no different than having something up on KDP select for free for a bit.

    The pricing model is a good one, though, and I like it. In actuality, its very simplicity makes it all the more remarkable. It keeps the bull shit out of the picture. Mark is a no-nonsense business guy and his plan is working for him.

    Hopefully, this is the year for my novels(in my new name) to come out, if real life issues don't get in the way. I plan on having many shorts, collections, novellas, and novels hitting the market. To me, allowing my readers to be able to read a tale, enjoy it, and being able to read another story immediately if they wish should keep the engines going. This makes sense to me, so much so that if I can't have everything up that I want, I will wait until everything is ready to go. So, my friend, sometime soon you will see my name all over the place, Blazing dog that I am.

    Blaze

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    1. I thought this post from Mark seemed familiar (and that I liked it). I followed the link and had indeed already commented there with similar comments (at least about pricing). And the interesting thing he mentioned was that indeed, he had already published many of these stories elsewhere.

      Look forward to seeing more out from you. I agree on the "keeping the engines going." That was probably my biggest lesson of the past year (of course, it was one of those "hindsight being 20-20" types of lessons :) Now I'm trying to catch up and get myself ahead at the same time.

      Hope you have a good Friday.

      Paul D. Dail
      www.pauldail.com- A horror writer's not necessarily horrific blog

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  5. Great post on the business side of writing, Blaze. Thanks!

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  6. Yes, Paul, that was you commenting. I thought you did such a great job that it lead to other points to be made. Thank you for inspiring a second post. This marketing thing is a whole new ball game now, as is publishing. Even if I don't get to publish some stories this year because of real life things,I intend to keep the "engines going" and have my name popping up everywhere. Short stories and novellas could very well prime the pump for novels to come.

    Blaze

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  7. Thank you, Cindy! We do want to sell books, don't we?

    Blaze

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